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A Hands-On Approach to Medicine and Ministry

David Hirsh noticed that third-year medical students tended to lose empathy for patients during their intensive rotations among many disciplines. To counter the trend, he helped Harvard Medical School develop a program that required teams of students to follow patients through diagnosis and treatment even after they were discharged from the hospital. It worked; the experience teaches medical students to be empathetic and patient-centered, and it's a concept that can benefit other professionals, including those in ministry and ministry training. Ministering, like medicine, must be done with a hands-on approach or you may lose sight of the people behind the practice. Learn more about the program on Faith & Leadership, an online resource from Leadership Education at Duke Divinity School.

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Are There Guns in Your Church

Connie Peterson is an accountant whose work requires a calculator, not a weapon. But she doesn’t go anywhere without...

6/10 Religiously Unaffiliated Americans are Athiest, Agnostic or “Nothing in Particular”

"A growing share of Americans are religiously unaffiliated. We recently asked a representative sample of more...

Art and Music Helping To Survive The Worst

“How do we survive when the worst happens? What are the mechanisms?” For Joe Carter, one answer was in spirituals —...

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Thu, Sep 27, 2018 - 09:00 am
The dates for Homecoming 2018 have been set for Sept.

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Review rank-ordered data on religion in the U.S. and around the world. Includes the latest data from the Religious Congregations & Membership Study, 2010

 

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