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The Lindisfarne Bible

The 1,300-year-old Lindisfarne Bible spent a year being dragged around the north of England on a cart, fleeing from the Vikings. The first translation of the New Testament into the then-contemporary Old English, it was produced on the island of Lindisfarne, just off the western coast of Britain. The Bible, in nearly perfect condition, has been safely stored in the British Library in London for decades; now it is visiting the Durham Cathedral, to where it was carried when the Christian community of Lindisfarne finally fled from recurring Viking raids. In a 6-minuted news video prepared for Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, a source for cutting edge reporting of religion and faith, correspondent Fred De Sam Lazaro guides an exploration of the creation, history, and cultural and physical construction of the famed, historic Lindisfarne Bible.

 

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International Peacemaker on Syrian Refugee Crisis at Union Seminary

Dr. Mary Mikhael, a native of Syria, will visit Union Presbyterian Seminary in Richmond October 3, 2018, to address the...

Discovering Hope in the Valley of Dry Bones

Struggling in the valley of dry bones?Listen and subscribe to Faith & Leadership's podcast, Can These Bones. The...

The Heart of a Servant and Faith Like a Child

Here are some sermon resources and art work for the Eighteenth Sunday after Pentecost - September 23, 2018 (Year B)...

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