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The Lindisfarne Bible

The 1,300-year-old Lindisfarne Bible spent a year being dragged around the north of England on a cart, fleeing from the Vikings. The first translation of the New Testament into the then-contemporary Old English, it was produced on the island of Lindisfarne, just off the western coast of Britain. The Bible, in nearly perfect condition, has been safely stored in the British Library in London for decades; now it is visiting the Durham Cathedral, to where it was carried when the Christian community of Lindisfarne finally fled from recurring Viking raids. In a 6-minuted news video prepared for Religion & Ethics Newsweekly, a source for cutting edge reporting of religion and faith, correspondent Fred De Sam Lazaro guides an exploration of the creation, history, and cultural and physical construction of the famed, historic Lindisfarne Bible.

 

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