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How Congregations do Social Service

In this chapter from the 2004 book, Congregations in America, Mark Chaves argues that churches typically engage in social services in a peripheral way. Most try to meet individual emergency needs with minimal involvement. Those churches that are deeply involved often collaborate with other religious organizations and secular groups.  These highly involved churches are more dependent upon secular agencies rather than creating alternatives to them. Contemporary congregations are as socially involved as congregations were at the beginning of the 20th century.  Likewise, collaborating with the government does not appear to dampen church political and advocacy activities. Read the full development of these themes in the PDF chapter

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Faith and Work

Industry leaders, CEOs, and trustees from the Fuller community reflect on evolving opportunities at the intersection of...

Is America a Christian Nation? Should it Be?

“Christianity, or any branch of it, loses its Christian character when its self-proclaimed supporters outnumber and...

Reflective Leadership Grants Offer Christian Leaders "Balcony Time"

"Balcony time" is to reflect on accomplishments, broaden perspectives and discern next steps. Clergy or lay leaders...

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Mon, Jul 9, 2018 - 09:00 am
Race is a reality that profoundly affects congregational life throughout the United States, and there is a growing desire among...

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ATLA Serials for Alum

The American Theological Library Association (ATLA) is a professional association providing support of theological and religious studies libraries and librarians. ATLA produces a prestigious line of electronic resources to support the scholarly study of religion and theology. Learn more.

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