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Kwanzaa Celebrations

Dates & Time: 
Mon, Nov 26, 2018 - 09:00 am to Tue, Jan 1, 2019 - 09:00 am
Thu, Dec 26, 2019 - 09:00 am to Wed, Jan 1, 2020 - 09:00 am

Faith & Leadership Resources

   Observing the African-American holiday of Kwanzaa has helped Ali Holness understand her uniqueness as a person of African descent and her value as a child of God striving to create unity among God’s people. [Read more}.

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Religion News Service

    Come each December, high atop the choir loft of St. Luke Community United Methodist Church in Dallas sit the traditional three purple and one pink Advent candles for several Sundays. But as the month comes to a close, another candelabra appears when the Kwanzaa kinara _ with its seven black, red and green candles representing principles of black heritage _ is placed on the altar below. “We’ll light the Advent candles and we’ll light the Kwanzaa candles,” said the Rev. Tyrone Gordon, pastor of St. Luke, where stained glass windows depict the civil rights movement. “Both have prominent places. The Advent candle, of course, is higher up and that’s symbolic because we’re Christian.” At some predominantly black churches, celebrating Christmas and Kwanzaa is a matter of both/and instead of either/or. Some congregations, especially those with an Afrocentric emphasis, mark both holidays, singing carols about Jesus and reflecting on Kwanzaa’s principles of unity and collective responsibility throughout December. [Read more at Religion News Service].

Kwanzaa 2018 in United States of America will begin on Wednesday, December 26 and ends on Tuesday, January 1, 2019

Sermon Resources from the African American Lectionary

Kwanzaa (pronounced Kwon-zah) means first fruits and is a non-religious seven-day celebration created in 1966 in the midst of the Black consciousness movement in the United States. [Read more].

Kwanzaa (pronounced Kwon-zah) means first fruits and is a non-religious seven-day celebration created in 1966 in the midst of the Black consciousness movement in the United States.

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