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Sociologists have tried to explain the decline of mainline denominations in a variety of ways. The truth is a little more complicated, says one prominent sociologist who has studied the data.

 

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Sociologists have tried to explain the decline of mainline denominations in a variety of ways. The truth is a little more complicated, says one prominent sociologist who has studied the data.

A decennial research project released May 1, 2012 shows Mormons, Muslims and nondenominational Christians are on the rise; however, it also indicates that less than 50 percent of Americans are claimed by a congregation.

Even lay people can, and should, ask tough questions about polls to see if their claims match their findings. And when it comes to poll data we should all be informed consumers.

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Though his intention was to alert the academic community to the trajectories and goals of the new... More > Catholic priest Jack Wall inherited a church with four members in 1983. Twenty years later, the... More >
The Alban Institute, a major resource for American congregations facing the challenges of a... More > The diversity in the contemporary seminary student population complicates pedagogical and... More >

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